Category: Research

Bad Ideas and Worse Realities: A Primer on Sex Work Stereotypes and Stigma

The purpose of this post is to begin to articulate the conceptual and material differences between a stereotype and a stigma, as each relates to sex work. My hope is that it will be useful to students in the “Sex Work and Sex Workers” class that I TA (which is why it reads as a primer on these concepts—because it is), as well as to sex work activists who are looking for rhetorical and theoretical tools to better explain how social beliefs and attitudes about sex work affect their lives. Continue reading

Want More? Check Out My Other Writing

As I sit with about a zillion posts in drafts and no time or energy to finish any of them (sorry, that’s basically the story of my life right now), I thought it might be a good idea to put up links to older stuff I’ve written in other places. Some of the newspaper articles are lost forever on the internet, but I have pdfs of most of the things that aren’t linked. And the rabble.ca and Briarpatch articles are open-access, yay!

Here it is: https://autocannibalism.wordpress.com/other-writing/

MOAR READING

I’ve added a page to this blog. It’s an archive of reading lists I sometimes make for funsies on Twitter. The first two links are to lists of open-access scholarly articles on:

  1. Indigenous sex work, gentrification and violence against Indigenous women in Canada
  2. Criminalization of HIV in Canada and the US (mostly)

You can find them here: https://autocannibalism.wordpress.com/open-access-reading-lists/

I’ll add other lists, and I’ll take suggestions of topics from sex workers, community members, allies, etc who want a quick primer on recent research literature on a social justice issue. This is fun for me, so I’m not picky about what I look up, as long as I know enough about it to be judicious about which readings to include.

I’d also be open to archiving other people’s lists (with proper credit, of course!) if you are into making them, don’t have a place of your own to keep track of them, and can do topics that I don’t know enough about to do myself.

I will not take suggestions of topics from undergraduate students who have been assigned research essays in their classes. Yes, I will know the difference. And yes, I will google you and rat you out to your professor. If you are a student, use your university library’s webpage to search a database of journals related to your topic — that’s the kind of research skill that lasts a lifetime.